Easy-breezy, Eco-friendly Back to School

It’s that time of year again where kids are dreading going back to school, while parents are eagerly pushing them out the door. As parents we do what we can to help our children have a successful and valuable school life experience. Helping our kids make healthy life choices early on ensures they’ll take those important lessons with them into adulthood.

My son is starting high school and it’s bittersweet for me because soon we’ll be thinking about college applications. But I still try to teach him to make healthy habits that I hope he’ll carry into adulthood. I try to instill values of the importance of a healthy school life balance. That includes eating well, getting enough sleep, and doing things that limits stress. But admittedly, school has become extremely stressful for children over the years. Too much competition within schools, peers, and even homelife. When I’m too stressed, I harken back to my younger years living at home with my folks and remember the balance that my own mom tried to teach me.

I’m going to list some of my tried and true, and favorite back to school tips and hacks. I wish I had more time during the day to make lavish breakfasts and lunches for my teenager, but most days that just won’t work out. Being a parent is one of the toughest jobs in the Universe, and we can all pretty much agree that we want the best for our kids, no matter their ages.

SCHOOL VS. HOME:

  • To save time and money, try to reuse what you have. If their backpacks are still in great working order, doesn’t have ripped seams, and still have all the zippers and pockets in tack, then clean up the backpack and reuse it. Unless your child has really outgrown their backpack, reusing them from year to year is a great way to save money, time, and produce less waste in the landfill. If unable to reuse, you can always donate the backpack or do a trade with a friend.

  • To keep school work separate, give your kids their own work station. Create a box, crate, or cabinet just for their school work. This will help you and your child find things a lot easier. Rotate throughout the years with things you want to keep and toss.

  • Create a lunch station. This can easily be done in any household and will save you a lot of time in the morning. Depending on the ages of your children, gather snacks that are healthy, delicious, and easy to eat. See below for easy lunch station snacks and ideas.

  • Buy bulk when possible. Buying bulk helps reduce extra waste and saves time. But, buy only bulk items your family constantly uses. Separate the items into the lunch station and school work station.

  • Healthy school lunches is crucial for maintaining your child’s energy throughout the day. Depending on their ages, children’s lunches should include a balanced meal, especially if they don’t eat breakfast. Some schools throughout the US offers free lunch but not all of them offer a healthy lunch. See below for healthy and delicious lunch ideas.

  • Create a winding down time before bedtime. The first couple of weeks of school can be exciting and stressful so setting a bedtime routine early will help your child get back on track. Turn off electronics at least one hour before bedtime, try not to drink any beverages at least one hour before bedtime, and take a soothing shower or bath before going to bed.

  • Have some wholesome and delicious afterschool snack. Kids are tired, grumpy, and most likely hungry after school, so having some snacks at home ensures they’re eating healthy while relaxing. See below for yummy afterschool snack ideas.

EASY, HEALTHY, AND DELICIOUS LUNCH AND SNACKS FOR KIDS:

Lunch from home should be quick, delicious, and healthy. Most students don’t have a lot of time to eat during lunch and recess because of the limited time for eating and playing. While you might be tempted (or insisted by your child) to pack conveniently bagged snacks you’d find in the supermarkets, they’re not all that healthy. It’s okay to include them once in awhile or limit to just one item in their lunch bag.

  • Yogurt squeeze – these yogurt squeezers or tubes are convenient and pack some needed nutrition and energy. They might not always be easy to open, so younger kids would need help opening them at school. Try to purchase yogurt squeezes that are low in sugar and fat as some brands hide the true value of nutrition by adding tons of sugar and artificial flavors and colors.

  • Cut or sliced fruits – fruits are nature’s best sugar so pack easy to eat ones such as grapes, sliced apples, sliced oranges, and berries such as strawberries, blueberries, and raspberries. Kids love to hold things in their hands so berries and sliced fruit are fun, delicious, and healthy!

  • Crackers and cheese snacks – choose whole wheat crackers and low sodium cheese. Cut cheese into cubes or thin slices so kids can make them into finger sandwiches if they want.

  • Yogurt Parfaits – a delicious, fun, and cute way of serving yogurt with fruit. Make it extra fancy by layering the yogurt, fruit, and any other toppings you have at home. Try these as a delicious after school snack for your kids.

  • Hummus and vegetables – these are great for school lunches or afterschool snacks. You can make homemade hummus or buy them at stores. Sliced vegetables such as carrots, radishes, and cucumbers pair well with hummus. Add fancier vegetables such as Haricot Verts, red and white carrots, asparagus, and endive for a special treat.

  • Hard-boiled eggs – most kids enjoy eggs whether they’re scrambled, fried, or hard boiled. Plus, they’re fun to peel and easy to eat. If you’re adding them to a school lunch, make sure you peel them first if your kids are little. This will save them time and frustration if they’re not used to peeling eggshells.

Try to avoid overly sugared lunch food. Kids will get that “sugar high” which isn’t beneficial to them or their teachers. Pack lunches that don’t spoil or keep an ice pack with their lunch containers. Be sure to pack them a reusable water bottle as schools should have a water refill station. Reusable utensils, and a sturdy lunch bag are necessary to create a safe and friendly environment for your child and everyone around them.

Best of luck for your school-aged children!

*photos courtesy of Martha Stewart Living

Disclaimer: The product(s)were sent to the author for review by the manufacturer/PR. All reviews on “Happymomblogger” remain unbiased and unpaid and are the sole decision of the author. The opinions of these product(s) were not influenced in any way, shape, or form. As always, please read the ingredients carefully when trying new products.

Please read the labels and ingredients carefully and follow all manufacturer’s instructions (if any). The products selected for the giveaway were generously donated by the companies/PR to help readers learn more about their products. The winner’s choice in using/consuming these products are entirely up to the winner and will not hold the author and her family liable nor the companies/PR liable. These products are made with non-toxic ingredients but always be safe with what you use and consume.

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Easy Ways for Kids to Start a Summer Garden

Summer is a great time to start a garden with children. With some free time before school starts, children can get a good harvest going before the fall and winter seasons. While temperatures are conflicting around the world, you can still find the right type of plants to grow in the summer and be ready for a hearty harvest in a couple of months.

My love for gardening and nature developed at a very young age. I thank both my parents for that because now I teach gardening to children at an elementary school and hope to instill in them a love of nature too. Whether you’re a beginner or an avid gardener, getting kids started at a young age gives them a chance to learn and grow at their own pace. Nature has no judgement and will in fact, bring you an abundance of joy and satisfaction for many, many years.

To get kids started in gardening, you must know the basics. The fundamentals of gardening helps develop good habits that leads to better understanding and less frustration. If you and your children already have a garden full of lovely plants, then that’s awesome. If not, or you’re just starting out, check out some easy tips to get you started on a lifetime of healthy living.

10 BASIC GARDENING TIPS:

1 – Decide on your garden space. Do you want a small patch of land in your yard? Do you want only planters?Or do you want a mixture of ground and raised? Once you decide on the type of garden you want, you can start planning!

2 – Decide on how much you want to invest in your garden. If you’re just starting out, it’s easier to start on a small budget. Any range between $50-$100 is a good starting point.

3 – Have your kids research on the type of plants they want to grow. Depending on their age, they can start with very basic and easy to take care of plants. I will list the type of plants below.

4 – Visit a garden center or big box stores like Home Depot and Lowe’s that has a garden center. Take some time to walk around and learn about the various types of plants. Touch the plants and smell them to see what you like.

5 – While at the garden center, pick up some easy to grow plants: mint (any type), tomatoes, cucumbers, cabbage, radish, sweet snap peas, bell peppers, daisies, sunflowers, and hibiscus (seasonal).

6 – Have your kids pick out basic garden tools: small hand shovel/spade, small hand rake, gloves, bucket, watering can, and gardening soil. Many gardening tools are made for children but I recommend getting them medium sized tools so they can eventually grow into them.

7 – Find the right spot in the garden. Most plants can take full sun up to 6 hours, depending on where you live. For easy to grow plants such as the ones mentioned above, try to grow them where there’s sun for most part of the day. If you plant in planters, they are easy to move around according to the position of the sun.

8 – Don’t over or under water your plants. How do you know if you’re over watering or under watering? Check the top soil. Place 2 fingers into the soil of where you plant is. If it’s moist, then you don’t need to water the plants yet. If it’s dry or not moist, then water them immediately. Over watering plants can kill them or cause plant diseases. Under watering plants can make it difficult for them to flourish again.

9 – Buy high quality planting soil. Once you’ve decided if you’re planting directly in ground or in planters, make sure you buy higher quality soil to give your new plants a chance to grow and flourish.

10 – Tag and monitor your plants. If you’re growing from seeds, it’s very simple to watch your seeds grow from seedlings to full plants. If planting seedlings that you got from the store, place markers in the soil with the name of the plant and the date it was planted.

A few other things to note as your child starts his/her journey into becoming a gardener. Besides doing the basics of gardening, invest in composting and upcycling. Being a gardener or just having a love for gardening is also being a steward of the planet. We garden because we appreciate nature and the love of living a healthy lifestyle. Gardening is therapeutic and resourceful. You can plant a bounty of delicious and healthy food to last you for many years or you can grow a garden just for show. All it takes are some simple steps to begin your garden and your kids will grow into a love for nature and making healthy choices.

 

*photo courtesy of Martha Stewart magazine

 

Disclaimer: The product(s)were sent to the author for review by the manufacturer/PR. All reviews on “Happymomblogger” remain unbiased and unpaid and are the sole decision of the author. The opinions of these product(s) were not influenced in any way, shape, or form. As always, please read the ingredients carefully when trying new products.

Please read the labels and ingredients carefully and follow all manufacturer’s instructions (if any). The products selected for the giveaway were generously donated by the companies/PR to help readers learn more about their products. The winner’s choice in using/consuming these products are entirely up to the winner and will not hold the author and her family liable nor the companies/PR liable. These products are made with non-toxic ingredients but always be safe with what you use and consume.

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Moms Meet Virtual WOW Summit Wrap-up

On Friday, March 11, 2021, the Moms Meet WOW Summit wrapped up their first virtual tradeshow event. This 3-day online event held topics on parenting, food choices for children, and tons of sneak peeks at new products from well known brands.

While I would have preferred an in-person trade show, the WOW Summit virtual event was put together in a professional and engaging way. Perhaps this is the new form of trade shows? With the upcoming Natural Products Expo West going virtual, we’ll have to make a comparison.

I learned a lot from the Moms Meet WOW Summit. Not only as a mom, but as a blogger and business entity. One particular webinar really resonated with me and I hope it can help you too!

Dr. Laura Markham author or Peaceful Parent, Happy Kids gave a really important webinar on how to create a happy and peaceful atmosphere for your kids:

Stop. Drop. Breathe. Those are the 3 important words that parents must remember when dealing with a difficult situation with their children. Stop what you’re currently doing or saying. Drop your agenda for the moment: calm yourself first by taking deep breaths. Breathe by taking a deep breath before you start again.

I learned that children who are yelled at on a normal basis becomes angrier and more anxious. That’s something I definitely have to remember! When we’re angry and frustrated, we tend to let our that frustration on our loved ones. And when it comes to your kids, they are almost too easily triggered due to their immaturity levels. Therefore, don’t just gather kindling. Soon you will start a fire that will be difficult to distinguish.

Dr. Markham also indicated that kids need to be with us to calm down. If they run off alone, they wouldn’t know how to resolve their anger and it might fester and grow angrier. We need to continue with the connection so kids can learn “self regulation”.

I hope the steps above can help you when you’re feeling like you’ve just had it. I’m going to try the practices mentioned by Dr. Markham and hope I will remember them when I need it.

I was also gifted a Moms Meet WOW Summit gift bag with some awesome products from many brands:

 

A huge thank you to Moms Meet and the guest speakers and brands! Hopefully we’ll see you at next year’s WOW Summit in person!

Disclaimer: The product(s)were sent to the author for review by the manufacturer/PR. All reviews on “Happymomblogger” remain unbiased and unpaid and are the sole decision of the author. The opinions of these product(s) were not influenced in any way, shape, or form. As always, please read the ingredients carefully when trying new products.

Please read the labels and ingredients carefully and follow all manufacturer’s instructions (if any). The products selected for the giveaway were generously donated by the companies/PR to help readers learn more about their products. The winner’s choice in using/consuming these products are entirely up to the winner and will not hold the author and her family liable nor the companies/PR liable. These products are made with non-toxic ingredients but always be safe with what you use and consume.

http://www.topmommyblogs.com/blogs/in.php?id=storm

 

Get Ready. Set. Plant – 10 Ways to Get Kids to Enjoy Gardening

It seems like I’ve been gardening all my life. And teaching children the skills and love for gardening are what brings me joy in the gardening world. If you can see their huge smiles and excitement as they watch their plants grow, then you know you have instilled a love for nature.

I still remember as a young child, my parents would bring me out to their backyard to help plant pumpkin seeds. I then graduated to planting tree saplings to learning how to transplant, divide plants, and propagate. While not every child desires to learn about plants, most of them do however enjoy being outdoors and digging their fingers in the soil.

There are health benefits to growing your own garden or planting your own food. You get to be outside in fresh air, you decide on what you want to grow, you can see pollinators visit your garden, and you can enjoy the bounty of your fresh fruits and vegetables! And there are many easy to grow plants for children no matter their skill level.

With spring just around the corner, now is the best time to prepare for your spring planting. If you like to start with seeds, get them ready as most seeds take about 7-10 days to sprout and then 2-3 months for the plants to be fully grown. If you can’t wait for the seeds to sprout and transplant, then seedlings or small established plants might be a better choice.

Below are 10 ways of getting your child to grow their own garden. These are fairly easy steps and you can start small with just a few plants.

1 – Start off with easy to grow plants: beans, beets, carrots, peas, radishes, and tomatoes. Beans, carrots, and tomatoes can be easily grown in planters. Be sure to purchase organic whenever possible as these are edible plants.

2 – Decide on whether you want to grow in a planter or directly in ground. Planters are great for beginners or if you have a small space. Make sure planters have good drainage holes.

3 – Do you or your child have a favorite flower? Research whether the flower is in season. Check out planting seasons here: https://www.highcountrygardens.com/plant-finder/easy-to-grow-perennials

4 – Decide if you want to grow from seeds or seedlings. Most seeds take about 7-10 days to sprout. Seedlings are usually about 2-3 inches tall and can be planted directly into the ground or in a planter that can accommodate the size of a fully grown plant. Growing from seeds are particularly fun because your child can track the growth of the seed as it germinates into a seedling!

5 – Take your child to a garden center. Walk around the garden center to see what’s in season and get inspiration. Talk to a horticulturist while there to get some insider tips on growing a bountiful garden! And while you’re there, pick up some plants and start planting!

6 – Purchase basic garden tools: thick gloves, garden spade, garden hand trowel, small rake, garden shears, and watering can. Get either child size tools or smaller adult size so they’ll grow with your child.

7 – Go on a nature walk at a local park or arboretum. This will inspire both you and your child to appreciate and discover various plants. Many arboretums also sell native plants so it’s a great time for your kiddos to pick out some on their own.

8 – A plant journal. Depending on the age of your child, you can have them start a plant journal where they can draw or cut out pictures of what they’re planting. Then record the start date of planting and the growth period. This also helps develop good recording skills for future planting and gardening techniques.

9 – Grow specific plants for pollinators. Great plants to grow for butterflies and bees are native flowers or all-inclusive plants such as herbs, sunflowers, and daisies. Pollinators help increase the growth of your own plants as well as help them pollinate other plants. I love growing Milkweed for Monarch butterflies. These unique and beautiful pollinators are particularly attracted to this specific plant.

10 – Plant a hummingbird habitat garden. Once in awhile I will grow plants that hummingbirds love right in front of my front door. It’s so delightful to hear their little wings flap as they drink the nectar from my plants. Hummingbird plants include Butterfly Bush, Trumpet Vine, and Honeysuckles. Just think of anything in a tubular flower shape where their long beaks can reach into the flowers.

See below to print out a Spring Planting Calendar so you’ll know the best times to plant and harvest.

KidsGardening Interactive Spring Planting Calender

Click to access interactive-planting-calendar.pdf

Instill the love of gardening and being in nature when your child is young. Teach them basic gardening skills and they’ll soon want to grow a garden for you!

Happy gardening!

*photos courtesy of High Country Gardens and KidsGardening

Disclaimer: The product(s)were sent to the author for review by the manufacturer/PR. All reviews on “Happymomblogger” remain unbiased and unpaid and are the sole decision of the author. The opinions of these product(s) were not influenced in any way, shape, or form. As always, please read the ingredients carefully when trying new products.

Please read the labels and ingredients carefully and follow all manufacturer’s instructions (if any). The products selected for the giveaway were generously donated by the companies/PR to help readers learn more about their products. The winner’s choice in using/consuming these products are entirely up to the winner and will not hold the author and her family liable nor the companies/PR liable. These products are made with non-toxic ingredients but always be safe with what you use and consume.

http://www.topmommyblogs.com/blogs/in.php?id=storm

Little Life Lessons – The Purpose of Life

When you’re a young child, life seems to be a constant bliss of playtime, food, and sleep. Before the age of five, the meaning of life wasn’t even a notion on your plate. As you grow older, so does your brain and your life experiences, and you start to pick up nuances and virtues along the way. But as we get into adulthood, sometimes the virtues we learned as a child get lost or displaced. We sometimes lose track of what it means to be a human being and more so, a decent human being.

What makes a person truly virtuous? You might see heroic or selfless acts from people all over the world. Is it an innate obligation to do right and to help others? We’ve seen people risk their lives to save another. We’ve seen someone pay for another person’s groceries. And we’ve seen people stand up to bullies. Perhaps they learned at a young age to just “do the right thing”, or they learned through hard lessons in life. But I ask this – what exactly is the right thing to do? And when is the right time to talk to our kids about virtue, honesty, and purpose?

When you’re school-aged, the importance of learning fundamental math and language arts is already part of the school curriculum. But how do you learn about your life purpose? And who do you learn it from? Our teachers can only teach what is offered in school. But sometimes you get lucky and you meet a teacher who teaches you how to succeed in life. I was fortunate to have met a few teachers who taught about humanity and compassion, and their teachings were amplified through their own kind actions.

As I nurture and teach my own child as he grows up, I hope and pray that he’ll have the necessary tools to navigate through adulthood. I wish he will grow up to be a person with values and virtues. With kindness and compassion. But I can only provide him with what I learned while living at home and through my own personal experiences.

At every opportunity possible, I try to talk to my son about his “life purpose”. And then I wonder if I start sounding like I’m forcing him to be someone he’s not, or doesn’t want to grow up to be. Oftentimes as parents, we reflect what we wish we were onto our children. Us parents might not have done all the things we wish we had done as children. Wished we had talked a certain way. Acted a certain way. Or became a different person. But I know that while he’s going through his own growing pains, I do see specks of kindness and purpose in him. He realizes what is important right now and that’s okay for me.

So when is a good time to teach children about “life’s purposes”? Experts might tell you that children don’t really grasp the meaning of life until they’re teenagers. But as soon as your child is old enough to start learning the difference between right and wrong, would be the best time to start. 

Below I’ve listed some talking points for your children depending on age. Of course everyone is different, and a child’s age doesn’t necessarily correlate with maturity and mentality. Please note that some of these questions are what I’ve come across throughout my years working with children.

Primary school age (grades 1-3):

  • Do you like school? Why/Why not?

  • Do you like your friends? Why/Why not?

  • What do you like best about school?

  • What do you like least about school?

  • What do you want to learn from your teachers?

  • What do you want your teachers to teach you?

  • Do you like animals? If so, what kind of animal?

  • What do you want to be when you grow up? Why do you want to be that?

Primary school age (grades 4-5):

  • Do you like school? Why/Why not?

  • What would you do if you meet a bully?

  • What would you do if you meet a stranger?

  • What do you want to learn from your teachers?

  • What do you want your teachers to teach you?

  • Why do you think homework is important?

  • Why do you think you should manage your hygiene?

  • What do you want to be when you grow up? Why do you want to be that?

Secondary school age (grades 6-8):

  • Do you like school? Why/Why not?

  • What would you do if you meet a bully?

  • What would you do if you find a $20 bill on the ground?

  • What would you do if you find a $5 bill on the ground?

  • Do you think you should say thank you even when you don’t need to?

  • Do you think you should help pay for your classmate’s lunch? 

  • Do you like animals? Why/Why not?

  • Do you care about your planet/environment? Why/Why not?

  • How do you think you can improve situations around you?

  • What would you do if someone fell on the floor?

  • What would you do if someone asks to copy your homework?

High school age (grades 9-12):

  • Do you like school? Why/Why not?

  • What’s most important in your life right now?

  • Why do you care about things?

  • What are your goals in high school?

  • Why are these goals important to you?

  • What would you do if your friend stops being your friend?

  • What do you think it means to be a good person?

  • What can you do to make a positive impact on the world?

  • What do you do if someone asks you to do something that isn’t right?

  • What do you hope to accomplish in 5 years? In 10 years? In 20 years?

  • How will you accomplish these goals?

As we’re approaching the holiday season, staying home and staying safe, this would be a great time to talk to your kids about these important topics. If you start asking these questions at a young age and then continue through high school, you might notice a dramatic change or very little change. But the wonderful thing about that is to see just exactly how your children changes as they get older. Oftentimes we’re afraid to ask our children the big questions. Heck, sometimes we’re even afraid to ask ourselves those same questions. But the sooner you get your children to open up about their own views of the world, the easier it is to talk to them about life’s little lessons and their own purpose in life.

For an in-depth talk with your teens, check out The Greater Good initiative: https://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/talk_with_teens_about_purpose

 

Disclaimer: The product(s)were sent to the author for review by the manufacturer/PR. All reviews on “Happymomblogger” remain unbiased and unpaid and are the sole decision of the author. The opinions of these product(s) were not influenced in any way, shape, or form. As always, please read the ingredients carefully when trying new products.

Please read the labels and ingredients carefully and follow all manufacturer’s instructions (if any). The products selected for the giveaway were generously donated by the companies/PR to help readers learn more about their products. The winner’s choice in using/consuming these products are entirely up to the winner and will not hold the author and her family liable nor the companies/PR liable. These products are made with non-toxic ingredients but always be safe with what you use and consume.

http://www.topmommyblogs.com/blogs/in.php?id=storm

 

 

 

We can accept your child now

Has there ever been a time where you were judged, critized, and basically blamed for every tiny infraction as a mother? Is it not enough we judge ourselves and live in perpetual self-doubt? But what happens when other people – whether they know you or not – shake their heads when they feel you are not doing something right in their heads? It’s not easy being a parent, but being a mother carries far more weight than a father would.

Most people might agree that motherhood begins when the baby in your womb starts growing. The connection is almost instant for most women and after you feel that little kick in your stomach, your entire world aligns with the stars. Which is why when others start judging and critizing how moms should raise their own children, you realize that you live in a world of blame first; accept after.

I come from a family that is pretty accepting of me. While my own parents might have pushed me to go beyond my limits as they had with my siblings – the after effects of being Asian and living the stereotype – they were still able to let me be who I wanted to be, albeit some fighting and tears throughout the years. When I got pregnant with my son, after a miscarriage and more self-doubt, I heard practically every advice thrown at me. Most of them from other moms, but mostly enough where I really doubted whether being a mother was really worth it. Now, after many years of growing pains for both my son and I, I shudder to think how I could have ever doubted myself in the beginning. It hasn’t always been an easy and smooth road, but being a mother and parent will never be a dull job.

As I watch my son grow from a toddler to a preschooler to a pre-teen, I often reflect on why I listened so intently to other people’s advice. That old adage of not judging others lest you be judged yourself can come in handy whenever someone else criticizes how you should parent your own child. Goodness forbid they criticize your child in front of you! And as I parent my child through the joys and turmoils of our lives, I’ve come to appreciate my own mom even more. They say eventually you’ll become your own parent. While that may be a blessing for those who had GREAT parents, others might not see it as a benefit.

So what should we do when others deem it their personal responsibility to judge you for your motherhood? Etiquette leaders might tell you to just smile politely and accept their criticism. The more involuntary reaction might be to instantly oppose that judgment – and you have every right to since you are the parent – not the other person. But if these criticisms are done in front of your own children then you might need to take a step back and think how your answer will affect your child. They will see and hear your reaction and quite possibly learn from it and imitate the behavior later on.

During these uncertain times with the global pandemic, the intense climate fluctuations, police brutality brought to light, and ongoing injustices, being a parent is even harder than before. And now, with most states doing online distance learning, most parents have no other choice than to stay at home and monitor their children while learning through Zoom. And even moreso when you have children in similar age ranges, the chaotic lessons and keeping track of all their teachers can leave all of us wishing school wasn’t so hard. Essentially, we are attending school with our kids, making sure they are paying attention and doing their homework. But, it is a huge learning curve and the best we can do is adjust and grow.

Throughout the years I’ve learned as a mom, an educator, and a friend with kids close to my child’s age, that you’re going to undoubtedly get judged for who you are. Not everyone will accept you or your child. Not everyone will like what your children wears, how they talk, how they act, how they play, how they breathe. But I say to those who judge critically to please leave my child be. He might be odd at times, he might be angry, or he might be shy. But he is quintessentially my child and he will surely grow through all the awkardness and the self judgement as he gets older.

So, I’ll leave you with some tips I’ve learned throughout the years to combat “mom guilt”. We all feel guilty at times, but don’t let that guilt stem from someone else who judged you for packing only chips and cookies into your child’s lunch bag. We all falter here and there, and as long as we are doing the best for our children, who are others to judge? The most important thing is to show our children that as a mom, we can overcome the injustices that will surely rise in their own years.

  • Trust your heart. Look inside yourself and see how you are raising your child. If they are inevitably joyful and peaceful, then you’re doing great.

  • Trust your own instincts. I’ve learned to be in-tuned with my mind and soul at a very young age. And later on, when I needed it the most, my instincts have brought me out of a lot of scrapes and bruises.

  • Trust professionals. If you ever have doubts or just not sure of parenting tips, find professionals who have had years of training and clinical experience. Or search online for parenting advice sites. Finding unbiased advice can help you through your difficult decisions.

  • Listen to your children. You are their parent. You don’t have to listen to your family, relatives, friends, or even strangers on the street for advice. So often we forget to listen to what our own children need and want.

  • Tune out. Yes, you probably tell your own children to never tune you out. But that’s quite different from someone who is judging you or your child for something that they dislike for themselves.

  • Use words to prevent mom guilt. Remind yourself that you held that baby inside your stomach for 9 months. And you have been raising your child for all these years using your own talents and skills.

  • And most importantly – everyone is different. The sooner we all realize that, the sooner we can all be more accepting. *If anyone ever criticizes your child or you, say this very line to them.

*Photo credits to Parents magazine and RedTricycle.com

 

Disclaimer: The product(s)were sent to the author for review by the manufacturer/PR. All reviews on “Happymomblogger” remain unbiased and unpaid and are the sole decision of the author. The opinions of these product(s) were not influenced in any way, shape, or form. As always, please read the ingredients carefully when trying new products.

Please read the labels and ingredients carefully and follow all manufacturer’s instructions (if any). The products selected for the giveaway were generously donated by the companies/PR to help readers learn more about their products. The winner’s choice in using/consuming these products are entirely up to the winner and will not hold the author and her family liable nor the companies/PR liable. These products are made with non-toxic ingredients but always be safe with what you use and consume.

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